Tag Archives: Diabetes

Race, ethnicity and kidney disease


African Americans, Hispanics, and American Indians are at high risk for developing kidney failure. This risk is due in part to high rates of diabetes and high blood pressure in these communities. Is this risk genetically pre-determined and further assisted with inferior diet choices? Will it be inethical for your doctor to advice you based on your ethnicity, if you face a higher chance of getting kidney failure in the future, based on genetically supported scientific data?  Below (under related articles) is more information about kidney failure for each of these groups, prevention and maintenance steps.
Kidney Disease

Rising diabetes and high blood pressure are the leading causes of kidney failure. Since the year 2000, the number of Hispanics with kidney failure has increased by more than 70 percent. While African Americans account for only 13 percent of the population, they account for more than 32 percent of the population with kidney failure.

Diabetes
If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, and are African American, you must strongly consider getting checked for kidney disease. Read more. Diabetes is the number one cause for kidney failure among African Americans, and high blood pressure is a close second. The goal is to keep blood pressure below 130/80, suggests the National Institute of Health.

High sugar diets can lead to diabetes. The fact is that ready-made food is made more appealing by adding sweeteners. Also, several cheap alternatives to sugar may be more dangerous than sugar itself. The poorer the person, the likelier that person is to choose a cheaper food, which might be sweetened to make up for the lack of taste from fresh food. Eating such sweetened food too often can lead to higher risk of diabetes. It is not surprising that the poorer people are getting more obese – another side reaction to eating sweetened food and drinking sweetened beverages. Diabetic persons are frequently obese from such food and beverage choices.  You might want to read “For the First Time in Human History, Overweight People Outnumber the Underfed“, by blogger Mother Nature’s Diet. Scientists have known for several decades that this obesity epidemic is restricted to specific, inferior diet choices, and dictated by differences in the genes inherited from family. Certain ethnic groups will get more obese simply because they do not inherit the genes required to “digest” or “metabolize” inferior food choices. Will it be inethical of the doctor to tell them that the eight year old, 300 pound little child is obese because of her ethnicity, dictated by the genes she inherited from her family, not giving her the ability to digest her fatty and sweetened school lunch? Which country has the highest obesity? Which country has the highest percentage of obese people? You might enjoy reading that the answer to the first is Mexico and the second is Nauru, a small country in the South Pacific (their inherited genes) in “Is this a Good Thing“, which summarizes the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture report.

A refreshing, non-scientific travel observation by blogger gaelic girl on “Victoria’s view: Why are Americans so obese compared to the Irish“, discusses smaller food portions, organic groceries, walking instead of using automobiles for errands, and higher rate of smoking among the Irish. It does not discuss their inherited genetics, since it isn’t scientific, but nonetheless, brings up excellent discussion topics on how to prevent obesity perhaps with the above life style choices, based on the observation that Irish people are a lot skinnier than the Americans, and are not even on the top 25 in the list of obese countries by United Nation’s Food and Agriculture report.

Genetically, there are certain ethnic groups far more at risk for diabetes and high-blood pressure and hence, kidney disease. The genes and junk regions around the genes that you inherited from your parents do define you (Read more). You might wonder why your friend can eat the same foods as you and yet not gain any weight or be at risk for diabetes, while you could be getting obese and at risk for getting diabetes followed by kidney disease.

High Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is another indicator/ risk factor of kidney disease with significant ethnic differences.

….compared to Caucasians, Afro‐Caribbeans and people of African descent have a higher incidence of stroke and end‐stage renal failure, whereas coronary artery disease is less common. Conversely, South‐Asians (defined as people originating from the Indian subcontinent and East Africa) have a higher incidence of coronary heart disease….

Read more. Quoted above from a study of patients in the United Kingdom, such ratios are similar in other developed countries with rising rates of high blood pressure.

In a landmark study, 18 genes have been discovered to be co-related with most of the deaths from heart disease, Britain’s biggest killer. Read more. A few ethnic groups account for most of the deaths from this killer disease, because they inherit these culprit genes from their families.

Getting to know your family takes on a whole new meaning with the knowledge that your biological inheritance from your family also determines your health and longevity. However, this same knowledge allows you to take prevention steps from this moment. You may have to have more self-control than a friend who lacks the culprit genes, but it may save your life.

Related Articles
Race, Ethnicity and Kidney Disease – National Kidney Disease Education Program. to learn more about kidney disease in each specific race.
How the biological inheritance from your parents defines you
Should we risk taking calcium supplementation with risk of heart attack, bones breaking and kidney disease?
Mineral balance is critical for healthy body functions – Role of the kidneys and increasing kidney disease
Kidney care and okra
Kidney care and natural nutrition
What are the five stages of kidney disease?
What African Americans with Diabetes or High Blood Pressure need to know and steps to take forward.

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How your nails speak about your health


Learn what secrets your nails can reveal about your health. See a slideshow by clicking here on the WebMD site on “What Your Nails Say About Your Health”. It has 11 slides, each with a caption that explains very well what the slides say.

Common Nail Conditions by Healthy Living
knowabouthealth.com

Just like the skin, the nails can reveal a lot about your health. The researchers at National Institute of health, USA says that Kidney disease can cause a build-up of nitrogen waste products in the blood, which can damage nails. Liver disease can damage nails. Thyroid diseases such such as hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism may cause brittle nails or splitting of the nail bed from the nail plate (onycholysis). You may click here to learn more about the nail abnormalities that could indicate a concern:
Considerations
Causes
Poisons
Medications
Normal Aging
When to call your Doctor

Toe Nail Fungus:
Should you suspect that you have toe nail fungus? You might learn more from the following:

You may click on the following links on toe nail fungus by Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota. Thousands of patients seek answers from their clinical experts who provide current medical information.
Definition
Symptoms
Causes
Risk Factors
Complications

If you have diabetes or a weakened immune system and suspect that you may have a nail disorder like a nail infection, do visit your doctor immediately. Diabetics have an impaired blood circulation and nerve supply to their feet. These might lead to additional complications which can be prevented with expert care. Do also keep in mind that brilliant scientists all over the world are working on amazing innovations to manage diabetes and artificially producing insulin. You may click here to read about one such innovation.

Related Articles: 

Too much calcium can break nails
Should we risk taking calcium supplementation with the risk of heart attack, bones breaking and ..
New York Scientists invent a novel way to remotely switch on an engineered gene to produce insulin..
Nails from Vanessa944Lammers

“>Slideshare on how to take proper care of your nails with photos

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Could anti-CD20 cure Type 2 – Diabetes? Stanford U. and U. Toronto researchers ask today


Researchers who have studied obesity and diabetes asked if both these diseases could be termed autoimmune diseases and  announced today that Type 2 – diabetes can be termed autoimmune disease and it causes obesity.  The human version of anti-CD20, called rituximab, is already FDA-approved to treat some blood cancers and autoimmune disorders. Which may lead to an interesting inquiry: Could this FDA – approved treatment for autoimmune disorders also treat some cases of obesity and all cases of Type 2-diabetes? Published in two articles in Nature medicine, one today and one earlier.

Two excerpts:
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According to co-first author Daniel Winer, MD:

This work will change the way people think about obesity, and will likely impact medicine for years to come as physicians begin to switch their focus to immune-modulating treatments for type-2 diabetes.
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Type-2 diabetes is characterized by the gradual development of insulin resistance, which affects the ability of the body to properly metabolize glucose. It’s associated with being overweight, but it can also have a genetic component. Despite the fact that millions of people have type-2 diabetes, the root cause of the insulin resistance is not known. In 2009, Daniel and Shawn Winer showed (also in Nature Medicine; subscription required) that T cells of the immune system were involved. Now they found that another immune cell, called a B cell, also plays an important role.

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Our genes respond differently to our diets


How do our genes respond to our diet?

Researchers studied cholesterol genes in six generations of baboons and found that siblings may have totally different reactions to the same high-fat diet and identified 53 possible genes for regulating HDL, which is one of the traits associated with an increased risk of heart and blood vessel disease. These researchers are looking further into these pedigreed, baboon families on the same fatty diet but with different levels of HDL and LDL.

Baboon and human HDL genes, in particular, are very similar and on the same chromosome making such research very meaningful for Genetics researchers at the Southwest Center for Biomedical Research (Texas). The chief researcher, Dr. Laura Cox was inspired as a child to understand the basic biology of all living things. As a society, we owe Dr. Cox and her team, special thanks to the tremendous progress in medical research in the field of diet and heart disease. Her team has shown significant correlation between genes and circulating fat, glucose, body weight and diabetes related symptoms (Heredity, 2008).

If heart disease research is important to you, do send a note to your favorite scientists and encourage them.

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